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Chapter 5. Aspiration: Risks and Prevention

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How much cricoid pressure has been shown to prevent gastric regurgitation?

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A. 10 N

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B. 20 N

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C. 30 N

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D. 40 N

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E. 50 N

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(C) 30 N is more than enough to prevent regurgitation into the pharynx in most patients. Pressures of greater than 30 N (approximately 3 kg, or 7 lb) are unlikely to be necessary. The originally described forces (40 N) would rarely be necessary to prevent gastric regurgitation.

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Which of the following is NOT true about cricoid pressure and airway techniques?

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A. The difficulty in ventilation using the LMA is dependent on the amount of pressure applied.

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B. Cricoid pressure reduces the incidence of gastric insufflation when using an LMA.

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C. Improper LMA placement can occur when cricoid pressure is applied.

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D. Ventilation via a face mask has not been shown to be affected by cricoid pressure.

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E. In the event of difficulty with laryngoscopy, cricoid pressure should be released.

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(D) All of the statements about cricoid pressure and airway techniques are true, including cricoid pressure can also affect ventilation via a face mask.

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Which of the following is NOT a known factor that increases the risk of aspiration?

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A. Emergency surgery

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B. Timing of surgery

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C. Lack of fasting

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D. Pregnant patients

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E. Children

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(E) All except young children are known factors that increase the risk of aspiration.

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