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Chapter 1. Evaluation of the Airway

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The most common factor leading to a failed airway is

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A. morbid obesity

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B. distorted airway anatomy

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C. upper airway obstruction

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D. failure to predict a difficult airway

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E. not knowing enough rescue techniques well

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(D) While others may play a significant role, the most common factor leading to a failed airway is failure to predict a difficult airway.

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The standard of care in airway management is related to all of the following EXCEPT:

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A. the skill of an average practitioner

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B. similar localities

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C. procedures that give the best results

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D. the expectations of the reasonable patient

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E. opinions offered by experts

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(E) The standard of care is the “conduct and skill of an average and prudent practitioner” that can be expected by the practitioner's peers and a “reasonable patient,” and not the opinions offered by experts.

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The standard of care expects that the average, reasonable airway practitioner ought to be able to do all of the following EXCEPT:

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A. be able to manage an unanticipated difficult airway

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B. be an expert and be able to use a flexible bronchoscope to intubate immediately in the face of a CICV airway

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C. be facile with one or two rescue devices or techniques in the face of a failed airway

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D. be able to perform a surgical airway

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E. be able to recognize and manage a failed airway

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(B) The standard of care does not expect the average, reasonable airway practitioner to be an expert and have the expertise in using highly technical airway techniques.

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